3.0 Restoration and reconstruction

Discretionary permit applications will be required for those repairs, restoration or reconstruction works which may impact the significance of the place. Typically, this will be works which involve greater amounts of intervention, changes to, or replacement of significant fabric or potential intrusions to the setting or presentation of a place.

3.1 Repair after minor damage (e.g. resulting from fire, storm, but not gradual decay)

What is eligible for a certificate of exemption? 
(ie: work that will have no impact or only negligible impact on the significance of the place)
When is a discretionary permit application required by the Tasmanian Heritage Council and what are appropriate outcomes?

Salvage involving the removal of loose debris (resulting from the storm/fire etc.), where significant elements are retained and/or identified and safely stored.


Reinstatement of significant elements to their original context.

Reconstruction of significant elements (in which the form, detail and materials will be consistent with a known earlier state).

See also section '1 Maintenance and repair of built elements' for repair of decayed elements.

Rebuilding to an altered form.

Appropriate outcomes:

Minimise changes to the significant features of a place.  Changes in concealed areas will in many cases be acceptable.

Damaged elements that are still structurally viable should retained and incorporated into the "rebuild" in their original location so that they can still contribute to the place's authenticity.

See also section '1 Maintenance and repair of built elements' for repair of decayed elements.


 

3.2 Restoration (ie: reinstating original fabric, possibly involving the removal of accretions)

What is eligible for a certificate of exemption? 
(ie: work that will have no impact or only negligible impact on the significance of the place)
When is a discretionary permit application required by the Tasmanian Heritage Council and what are appropriate outcomes?

Restoration in which:

  • suitably qualified and experienced tradespeople are employed to carry out the work;
  • the fabric is still in existence and is able to be re-used; 
  • reconstruction is minimal, involving the substitution of missing or defective components with replica elements in a way that does not diminish the integrity of the whole.
  • accretions needing to be removed are clearly not historic fabric.
Reinstatement of elements (including original fabric) where the context of that fabric has substantially changed since it was removed.

Appropriate outcomes:

Traces of the place's evolution and history of use, which provide an important tangible illustration of its history and significance, should not to be stripped away to facilitate a preferred presentation of the place.

In some cases it may be appropriate to demolish later additions that have little or no significance in order to restore or reconstruct elements that will reveal or enhance more significant aspects of the place.

Avoid adding details that are out of harmony with the place's architectural period as this will lead to confusion when trying to understand how a place has evolved.

The new work should be materially compatible with what exists so as not to create conditions that will result in the decay of existing fabric. 


 

3.3 Reconstruction (ie: new material introduced to replicate an element that is missing)

What is eligible for a certificate of exemption? 
(ie: work that will have no impact or only negligible impact on the significance of the place)
When is a discretionary permit application required by the Tasmanian Heritage Council and what are appropriate outcomes?

Reconstruction in which:

  • suitably qualified and experienced tradespeople are employed to carry out the work;
  • clear documentation exists to enable an earlier state to be reproduced.
  • the reconstructed fabric is visually and physically compatible with the existing fabric;
  • the new work will be identifiable on close inspection or through interpretation.
Reconstruction where some aspects of the place's significance may be compromised. 

Appropriate outcomes:

The work should be preceded by an investigation of the place's heritage significance and an analysis of competing or conflicting aspects of significance.

In some cases it may be appropriate to demolish later additions that have little or no significance in order to restore or reconstruct elements that will reveal or enhance more significant aspects of the place.

Material salvaged from other places and used in reconstruction should not be treated in a manner that conveys a false impression of the history and characteristics of the place.  Interpretation can be used to counter and likely misconceptions.


 

3.4 Invasive investigation

What is eligible for a certificate of exemption? 
(ie: work that will have no impact or only negligible impact on the significance of the place)
When is a discretionary permit application required by the Tasmanian Heritage Council and what are appropriate outcomes?
Removing non-significant fabric to expose underlying significant fabric (without disturbance of the significant fabric).

Removing small amounts of significant material as samples for analytical purposes, where the resultant damage is discreet and repairable
Major disturbance of significant fabric for investigative purposes. 

Appropriate outcomes:

Invasive investigation may be justifiable where it will assist in the conservation of the place. 

Investigative work should be planned and managed so as to cause the least possible physical impact. 

See also section '7. Excavation and archaeological investigation'.


 

Case Study (Reconstruction):  St Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, Colebrook

St Patrick's Roman Catholic Church is a landmark building in Colebrook. The church was constructed in 1855-57 to the design of internationally renowned architect A.W.N. Pugin. In 1895, a severe storm blew down the bellcote and damaged the church. Essential repairs were carried out but the bellcote was not replaced.

In 2007, works were undertaken to reconstruct the bellcote. Pugin's original design was used as the basis for the bellcote, adapted to include steel reinforcement and bracing to prevent similar structural damage in future storms.

The reconstruction of the bellcote returned the Church closer to its original design and enhanced its architectural character and townscape contribution.

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